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The Social Security Administration has launched a new public service announcement campaign to warn people about an ongoing nationwide telephone impersonation scheme.

Social Security and its Office of the Inspector General continue to receive reports about fraudulent phone calls from people falsely claiming to be Social Security employees. A press release states that the scammers mislead victims into making cash or gift card payments for help with purported identity theft, or to avoid arrest for bogus Social Security number problems.

“I want every American to know that if a suspicious caller states there is a problem with their Social Security number or account, they should hang up and never give the caller money or personal information. People should then go online to oig.ssa.gov to report the scam call to Social Security,” Social Security Commissioner Andrew Saul said.

People also are advised to be on the lookout for a new version of this scam. Fraudsters are emailing fake documents in attempts to get people to comply with their demands, the press release states. Victims have received emails with attached letters and reports that appear to be from Social Security or the OIG. The letters may use official letterhead and government jargon to convince victims they are legitimate; they may also contain misspellings and grammar mistakes.The new PSA addressing the telephone impersonation scheme is available online at www.youtube.com/socialsecurity.

Social Security employees do occasionally contact people — generally those who have ongoing business with the agency — by telephone for business purposes. However, Social Security employees will never threaten a person, or promise a Social Security benefit approval, or increase, in exchange for information or money. In those cases, the call is fraudulent and people are advised to hang up.

Generally, the agency mainly calls people who have recently applied for a Social Security benefit, someone who is already receiving payments and requires an update to their record, or a person who has requested a phone call from the agency. If a person is not in one of these situations, they normally would not receive a call from the agency.

Social Security will not:

• Tell you that your Social Security number has been suspended.

• Contact you to demand an immediate payment.

• Ask you for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.

• Require a specific means of debt repayment, like a prepaid debit card, a retail gift card, or cash.

• Demand that you pay a Social Security debt without the ability to appeal the amount you owe.

• Promise a Social Security benefit approval, or increase, in exchange for information or money.

If there is a problem with a person’s Social Security number or record, in most cases Social Security will mail a letter. If a person needs to submit payments to Social Security, the agency will send a letter with instructions and payment options. People should never provide information or payment over the phone or Internet unless they are certain of who is receiving it.

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